13 Facts About The Flu Shot Everyone Should Know

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No, you won’t get the flu from the flu shot. But you will get some really cool antibodies.

21. The flu vaccine is the best way to prevent yourself from getting sick and from spreading the flu to others.

"It's spread through respiratory secretions, so from things like coughing or sneezing, which then make their way into someone else's mouth or get on a shared surface," Eiras tells BuzzFeed Health. Here's an example of how transmission occurs: Someone sneezes into their hands then shakes your hand shortly after, and then you touch your mouth while eating. That’s all it takes. The flu is easily spread in enclosed spaces with many people, Eiras says. Schools and offices are hot spots for transmission. It's simple: if you don't want to get the flu (or if you get it, to at least lessen its severity), get the flu shot. The more people get vaccinated, the less flu can spread among a community. Sure, the vaccine’s effectiveness can vary and isn't 100% (we'll get to that more in a bit!), but recent CDC studies estimate that the vaccine can reduce the risk of the flu in the overall population by 40–60%, which is a substantial amount. It’s recommended that everyone over 6 months old get the flu shot, except for people with a documented allergy to an ingredient in the vaccine, says Eiras. (We’ll also get into that in a bit.)Use the CDC’s Flu Vaccine Finder to find out which pharmacies and clinics are offering the shot in your area.

Peter Dazeley / Getty Images / Via gettyimages.com

“It’s spread through respiratory secretions, so from things like coughing or sneezing, which then make their way into someone else’s mouth or get on a shared surface,” Eiras tells BuzzFeed Health. Here’s an example of how transmission occurs: Someone sneezes into their hands then shakes your hand shortly after, and then you touch your mouth while eating. That’s all it takes. The flu is easily spread in enclosed spaces with many people, Eiras says. Schools and offices are hot spots for transmission.

It’s simple: if you don’t want to get the flu (or if you get it, to at least lessen its severity), get the flu shot. The more people get vaccinated, the less flu can spread among a community. Sure, the vaccine’s effectiveness can vary and isn’t 100% (we’ll get to that more in a bit!), but recent CDC studies estimate that the vaccine can reduce the risk of the flu in the overall population by 40–60%, which is a substantial amount. It’s recommended that everyone over 6 months old get the flu shot, except for people with a documented allergy to an ingredient in the vaccine, says Eiras. (We’ll also get into that in a bit.)

Use the CDC’s Flu Vaccine Finder to find out which pharmacies and clinics are offering the shot in your area.